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  • Kansas Treatment Facility Breakdown by Type:
  • (122) Alcohol Addiction Treatment
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  • (40) Women
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  • (54) Dual Diagnosis
  • (25) Alcohol Detox
  • (76) Services for Young Adults
  • (44) Mental Stability and Alcohol Abuse Treatment
  • (36) Hearing Impaired Clients
  • (10) Alcohol Day Treatment Services
  • (23) Mental Balance Treatment Services
  • (14) Transitional Living Services
  • (19) Residential Long-Term Treatment for Alcohol Abuse
  • (19) Expectant Mothers
  • (3) Residential Beds for Adolescents
  • (7) Over 50
  • (20) Residential Short-Term Treatment for Alcoholism
  • (7) Foreign Languages other than Spanish
  • (7) AIDS/HIV Clients
  • (8) Lesbian and Gay
  • (2) Health Services
  • (2) Inpatient Hospital Treatment
  • (1) American Indian and Alaska Native Languages
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Choosing an alcohol rehab in Kansas can often be a complicated process, with so many available alcohol rehabilitation options; some of these include inpatient or outpatient and short term and long term alcohol treatment, just to name a few. Many Kansas alcohol rehab programs also offer various modalities of treatment. Because every person is unique, a Kansas alcohol treatment program will be most effective and yield the best results when the alcohol rehabilitation includes components that specifically address the personal needs of the individual that is seeking to recover from alcoholism.

Sometimes an individual from Kansas will make the choice to attend an outpatient alcohol treatment program that will enable them to attend their alcohol recovery classes and to still be able to meet their obligations at home; not everyone with a serious alcohol abuse problem can succeed with this limited level of alcohol rehabilitation. Another alcohol rehab option in Kansas is residential inpatient rehabilitation, which allows the individual to live at the alcohol rehab facility where they can focus solely on their alcohol treatment program.

The first step in a quality alcohol rehab in Kansas is detoxification; Alcohol detoxification is a process by which professionals can safely manage the physical withdrawal symptoms that can occur when an individual suddenly quits drinking. It is extremely important that an individual from Kansas that has completed the detox process, moves forward directly with a comprehensive alcohol rehabilitation program that includes counseling or group classes, relapse prevention education and some type of follow up care. The main goal of any quality alcohol rehab should be to help the individual from Kansas, that has been struggling with alcoholism, to get to a place where they will able to successfully achieve a state of lasting abstinence.


Kansas alcohol related information and statistics are provided by the US Dept. of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and the National Conference of State Legislatures, 2004. In Kansas, the total number of alcohol related fatalities peaked in 1986. The percentage of drunk driving deaths out of the total traffic fatalities was also highest in 1986. Kansas experienced a general downward trend in alcohol related fatalities since 1982. In 2008, out of all traffic fatalities, 38% involved a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of 0.08 or higher.

All 50 states in the US now apply two statutory offenses to operating a motor vehicle while under the influence of alcohol. The first (and original) offense is known either as driving under the influence (DUI), driving while intoxicated/impaired (DWI), or operating while intoxicated/impaired (OWI). This is based upon a Kansas police officer's observations (driving behavior, slurred speech, the results of a roadside sobriety test, etc.) The second offense is called "illegal per se", which is driving with a BAC of 0.08% or higher. Since 2002 it has been illegal in all 50 states to drive with a BAC that is 0.08% or higher.

The table below shows the total number of traffic fatalities (Tot) for the Kansas, alcohol related fatalities (Alc-Rel) and fatalities in crashes where the highest BAC in the crash was 0.08 or above (0.08+). It is important to note that the Kansas drunk driving statistics, as shown below, include data from individuals in Kansas who were in an alcohol-related crash, but not driving a motor vehicle at the time. The U.S. Department of Transportation defines alcohol-related deaths as "fatalities that occur in crashes where at least one driver or non-occupant (pedestrian or pedalcyclist) involved in the crash has a positive BAC value."'

Year

Fatalities

Tot

Alc-Rel

%

0.08+

%

1982

498

253

51

228

46

1983

411

214

52

185

45

1984

510

251

49

215

42

1985

486

214

44

191

39

1986

500

279

56

238

48

1987

491

248

50

202

41

1988

483

225

47

197

41

1989

428

194

45

165

39

1990

444

227

51

201

45

1991

409

189

46

164

40

1992

387

158

41

134

34

1993

428

157

37

132

31

1994

442

169

38

147

33

1995

442

184

42

164

37

1996

490

203

41

163

33

1997

482

147

30

128

27

1998

492

165

34

141

29

1999

540

193

36

162

30

2000

461

161

35

137

30

2001

494

193

39

167

34

2002

507

227

45

200

39

2003

471

206

44

182

39

2004

461

148

32

121

26

2005

428

151

35

122

28

2006

466

162

35

135

29

2007

416

142

34

114

27

2008

385

157

41

145

38



2003-2004 Kansas Alcohol Related Issue: Percentage % Ranking

Alcohol Abuse or Dependence

8.15%

[21st of 51]

Alcohol consumption > Binge drinkers

12.8%

[40th of 52]

Alcohol consumption > Casual drinkers

49.2%

[38th of 52]

Alcohol consumption > Heavy drinkers

3.7%

[44th of 52]

Alcohol related traffic fatalities

148

[33rd of 51]

Alcohol related traffic fatalities (per capita)

0.539 per 10,000 people

[27th of 51]

Alcohol related traffic fatalities, as a percentage

32%

[45th of 51]

Alcohol Use in the Past Month

48.54%

[34th of 51]

Sources: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) 2003-2004, Office of Applied Studies 2003-2004 and the MADD Official Website statistics 2004

When is a driver considered to be legally drunk in Kansas?

  • Non-commercial drivers age 21+ in Kansas are considered legally drunk when their blood alcohol level is .08 or more.
  • Drivers of commercial vehicles in Kansas are legally drunk when their blood alcohol level is .04 percent or greater. In Kansas, school bus drivers are commercial drivers.
  • Drivers under 21 in Kansas are legally drunk when their blood alcohol level is .02 or more.

Penalties for Drunk Driving in Kansas

  • Punishment for first-time offenders in Kansas is a term of imprisonment of 48 hours to six months. First-time offenders must also pay a fine ranging from $500 to $1,000. These offenders must serve at least 48 consecutive hours of imprisonment or 100 hours of public service either before, or as a condition of, any grant of probation or suspension, reduction of sentence, or parole. First-time offenders must also enroll in, and successfully complete, a Kansas alcohol and drug safety education and/or treatment program. The driver's license suspension period is 30 days. Following the suspension, these offenders will be required to drive on a restricted license for 330 days. A judge will determine what type of restriction to put on the offender's license after considering the circumstances surrounding the conviction.
  • Second-time offenders in Kansas face a term of imprisonment of 90 days to one year. They must also pay a fine ranging from $1,000 to $1,500. Second-time offenders must serve at least five consecutive days in prison before the offender is granted probation, suspension or reduction of sentence, or parole, or is otherwise released. These offenders are required to enter into and complete a Kansas treatment program for alcohol and drug abuse. The driver's license suspension period is one year. At the end of the suspension period, these offenders will be restricted to driving only a motor vehicle equipped with an ignition interlock device for one year.
  • A third-time offender in Kansas faces 90 days to one year in prison. These offenders must also pay a fine ranging from $1,500 to $2,500. Third-time offenders are not eligible for release on probation, suspension or reduction of sentence, or parole until they serve at least 90 days in prison. The driver's license suspension period is one year. At the end of the suspension period, these offenders in Kansas will be restricted to driving only a motor vehicle equipped with an ignition interlock device for one year.
  • For a fourth or subsequent conviction in Kansas, the prison sentence is between 90 days and one year. The fine is $2,500. These offenders are not eligible for release on probation, suspension or reduction of sentence, or parole until serving at least 90 days in prison. After serving time, the offender in Kansas will be placed in the custody of the Secretary of Corrections for one year of post-release supervision. During this time, the offender will be required to participate in a Kansas in-patient or an out-patient program for alcohol and drug abuse. The driver's license suspension period is one year. At the end of the suspension period, fourth-time offenders in Kansas will be restricted to driving only a motor vehicle equipped with an ignition interlock device for one year. Those committing a fifth or subsequent offense in Kansas will have their driver's licenses permanently revoked.

Enhanced Penalties in Kansas for Drunk Drivers Carrying Passengers Under 14

If a person commits a DUI in Kansas while someone under 14 was in the vehicle, the person's punishment will be enhanced by an additional one month in prison.

Enhanced Penalties in Kansas for Habitual Violators

Those in Kansas convicted of DUI three times within a five-year period are "habitual violators." Once a person becomes a "habitual violator," he or she will lose driving privileges for three years.

Commercial Drivers

In addition to other penalties associated with Kansas' DUI laws, a commercial driver who is convicted of DUI for the first time while driving any vehicle will be disqualified from driving a commercial vehicle for at least one year. If, however, the driver was transporting hazardous materials at the time, the disqualification period is at least three years. If a commercial driver in Kansas commits a second DUI while driving any vehicle, he or she will be disqualified from driving a commercial vehicle for life, which may or may not be reduced to 10 years.

Drivers Under 21

In addition to other penalties that may apply, drivers under 21 who fail a blood alcohol test in Kansas will receive an one year driver's license suspension.

Criminal Penalties in Kansas for Selling Liquor to an Intoxicated Person

Under Kansas law, it is a crime to sell liquor to a person who is drunk. A violation of this law is punishable by a prison term of up to 30 days, a fine ranging from $100 to $250, or both.

Criminal Penalties in Kansas for Furnishing or Selling Alcohol to Minors

In Kansas, it is a crime for a person to furnish alcohol to a minor. A violation of this law subjects the offender to up to six months in prison and a fine of up to $1,000. The minimum fine, however, is $250. It is also a crime for licensed drinking establishments in Kansas to sell alcohol to those under 21. A violation of this law subjects the offender to up to six months in prison and a fine of up to $1,000. The minimum fine, however, is $200.

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  • The adolescent brain, still undergoing several maturational processes, is more vulnerable to some of the effects of alcohol and other drugs.
  • Students at smaller colleges are inclined to drink more alcohol than students at larger schools.
  • Blood or urine biomarker tests cannot determine who has alcohol dependence, only whether a person has been drinking recently.
  • Carbonation works to speed the absorption of alcohol; food and water help to slow this absorption.